The decision, in July, by the FCC (Federal Communication Commission) to make high-frequency bandwidth spectrum available for 5G technology, was greeted by the U.S telecom industry with great delight, placing the U.S. on the path to lead global deployment of 5G. 

There has been a lot of talk recently about 5G wireless technology - which will likely be available for consumers sometime around 2020. The underlying agility and elastic nature of 5G will significantly increase transmission speed and capacity of all consumer devices, resulting in devices that will run 10 or even 100 times faster.

Adapting in real-time to changes in end-user applications, 5G technology will support vast amounts of IoT devices and connected vehicles using cellular networks, while smart-city energy grids, water systems, and immersive education and entertainment will become a daily reality. Transitioning to this technology will naturally make cable-based infrastructure - superfluous.

The decision, in July, by the FCC (Federal Communication Commission) to make high-frequency bandwidth spectrum available for 5G technology, was greeted by the U.S telecom industry with great delight, placing the U.S. on the path to lead global deployment of 5G. 

There has been a lot of talk recently about 5G wireless technology - which will likely be available for consumers sometime around 2020. The underlying agility and elastic nature of 5G will significantly increase transmission speed and capacity of all consumer devices, resulting in devices that will run 10 or even 100 times faster.

Adapting in real-time to changes in end-user applications, 5G technology will support vast amounts of IoT devices and connected vehicles using cellular networks, while smart-city energy grids, water systems, and immersive education and entertainment will become a daily reality. Transitioning to this technology will naturally make cable-based infrastructure - superfluous.

U.S. vs. EU in the race towards 5G

The FCC’s announcement about opening a new spectrum for 5G was viewed as a significant milestone in standardization, positioning the U.S. as the first country to enable the fuelling of next generation wireless networks. Simultaneously, EU policymakers have set forth a series of guidelines for implementing 5G technology, expected to be finalized at the end of the summer, while European telcos call for less regulation and more freedom to optimize their own networks, rather than having to follow rigid rules.

European industries are already working with EU Telcos, testing new technologies to enhance automated driving. Europe’s telcos have recently requested EU grants and venture funds for funding such experimentation, and for investing in start-ups developing 5G applications. The plan is that by 2020, 5G will be launched in at least one city in each of the 28 EU nations - serving as smart innovation hubs of social and economic activities.

5G expected to drive a new paradigm shift in billing methods

The telecom industry predicts that 5G networks will be divided into groups of industries and consumer services, sharing the same infrastructure. 5G will require significant investment in infrastructure, which will involve an industry shift from big cell towers with large geographic coverage, to small access points - the size of smoke alarms – located, essentially, everywhere.

This shift will result in a far more complex billing world. New connected devices, equipped with sensors, will require measuring of usage, for which providers and operators will have to charge. Furthermore, while usage of email, internet and phone, is currently measured by the amount of data we consume - 5G will likely require a more granular approach, by which each access to the network will be billed. For example, when booking a vacation, consumers will be compensated by the vacation provider, through the internet operator, for using a selected data channel to order a vacation. Alternatively, operators may introduce variable pricing, which could result in different rates for data usage during peak times vs. off-peak hours.

There are numerous approaches for managing the service aspects of this new bandwidth access. One thing, though, is for sure: In order to leverage these opportunities, operators and businesses alike will require innovative, elastic billing solutions that can meet market demands, and provideflexible plans, tailored to market reaction.

 

*This article is based on information from the following articles:

http://www.telecomstechnews.com/news/2016/jul/15/5g-milestone-reached-ultra-high-frequency-spectrum-made-available/

http://www.rcrwireless.com/20160712/internet-of-things/5g-europe-telecom-tag28

http://www.networkworld.com/article/3095832/mobile-wireless/telecom-industry-hails-fcc-move-to-open-5g-spectrum.html

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